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Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A Arnold Schmidt

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Arnold Anthony Schmidt, Ph.D., Professor of English at the California State University, Stanislaus, received his B.A. and M.A. in English from the State University of New York at New Paltz and his Ph.D. in English from Vanderbilt University.

Schmidt’s film credits include serving as Assistant Producer on "The Silence," an American Film Institute production nominated for a 1983 Academy Award best short dramatic film; writing a screenplay for Deja Vu, a 1984 Cannon Films feature starring Jaclyn Smith, Nigel Terry, Shelley Winters, and Claire Bloom; and writing the story for the "Tommy's Lost Weekend" episode of the Warner Bros. sitcom Alice, which was nominated for a 1985 Emmy Award and received 1986 Letter of Commendation from Los Angeles County for its treatment of teenage alcoholism.

His academic articles on Byron, Conrad, Garibaldi, Godwin, Scott, Mary Shelley, and Wordsworth have appeared in such venues as the Byron Journal, the Journal of Anglo-Italian Studies, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, and The Wordsworth Circle, as well as in the anthologies Fictions of the Sea and Beyond the Roots: The Evolution of Conrad’s Ideology & Art, which just appeared in a Polish translation. His first book, Byron and the Rhetoric of Italian Nationalism, from Palgrave-Macmillan (2010), received an Elma Dangerfield Award from the International Byron Society.

Schmidt received an award as the 2013 Research Professor of the Year from CSU Stanislaus, where he teaches classes in Film, Literature, and Creative Writing. In 2015, he received an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship to pursue research at San Marino’s Huntington Library. His three-volume, 24-play anthology of British Nautical Melodramas, 1820–1850 is forthcoming from Pickering & Chatto/Routledge in 2017.

 

Is there anything from the nineteenth century you wished would come back into fashion? Salons. I wish we had regular . . .

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Monday, September 28, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3051)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A Abby Glowgower

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Abigail (Abby) Glogower is a PhD Candidate in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, where she focuses on nineteenth-century American art and visual culture. Her dissertation (which she hopes to complete in 2016) explores the many roles print portraiture played in constructing social knowledge between 1820 and 1860. She is currently preparing a manuscript for publication about McKenney and Hall’s History of the Indian Tribes of North America (1837–1844), which she presented on at the 2014 NCSA conference in Chicago and her review of NCSA 2015 speaker Jennifer Roberts’s newest book, Transporting Visions: The Movement of Images in Early America, will appear in issue 50 of the British Journal of American Studies. Abby has taught courses in writing and art history at the University of Rochester, curated exhibits at the Rush Rhees Library Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, and is a History of Photography docent at the George Eastman House Museum in Rochester. She and her partner, Josh, share their home with their three dogs: Emmett, Judah, and Lucy.

Is there anything from the nineteenth century you wished would come back into fashion? Posture! During my fourth year of graduate school, I experienced . . .

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Monday, September 21, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3056)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Judith W. Page

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Judith W. Page is Professor of English and Distinguished Teaching Scholar at the University of Florida, where she also served as Director of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research from 2009-14. She is the author of numerous articles, book chapters, and reviews on Romanticism, women writers, and Anglo-Jewish literature and culture. Her recent books include Women, Literature, and the Domesticated Landscape: England’s Disciples of Flora, 1780-1870 (co-authored with Elise L. Smith), which came out last year in paperback from Cambridge University Press and an edited volume, Disciples of Flora: Gardens in History and Culture (edited with Victoria Pagán and Brigitte Weltman-Aron), which came out this month from Cambridge Scholars Press. Her essays have recently appeared in The Cambridge Companion to Pride and Prejudice (2013), Wordsworth in Context (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth (2015).  Her current book project will extend her work on women and gardens into the twentieth century, and will include work on such figures as Beatrix Potter and Vita Sackville-West. She has developed a graduate course at the University of Florida on women and gardens in the (very) long nineteenth century in England. 

 

What historical figure would you love to see in 21st century life?  Wordsworth! In the Preface to Lyrical Ballads Wordsworth laments that . . .

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Monday, September 14, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3160)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Amy Arbogast

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Amy Arbogast is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Rochester.  Her dissertation, which she plans to complete and defend this year, examines the emergence of professional playwriting in the United States from 1870 to 1908, investigating why professional playwrights did not exist prior to this era and what conditions developed to make professional playwriting possible.  Although largely a cultural historian, her work also combines elements of business and social history.  Amy currently works as a lecturer for the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program at the University of Rochester, where she teaches introductory writing courses and advanced public speaking courses.  In addition to finishing her dissertation, she is also working on an article that examines the evolving relationship between the new business class and American playwrights in the late nineteenth century and how that relationship provided validation for both groups.  She hopes to submit this article for publication this Fall.  Amy has attended the NCSA conference for the past two years and helped to organize the Graduate Student Caucus events for the 2015 conference.

 

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be?  There are too many . . .

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Tuesday, September 08, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2925)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Joseph Acquisto

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Joseph Acquisto is Professor of French at the University of Vermont.  This year, he published his third book, The Fall out of Redemption: Thinking and Writing Beyond Salvation in Baudelaire, Cioran, Fondane, Agamben, and Nancy, which claims that Baudelaire inaugurates a new kind of modernity by canceling the notion of redemption in his writing while also steadfastly refusing to embrace any of its secular equivalents, such as historical progress or salvation through art.  His other books include French Symbolist Poetry and the Idea of Music and Crusoes and Other Castaways in Modern French Literature, as well as the edited volumes Thinking Poetry: Philosophical Approaches to Nineteenth-Century Poetry and Poets as Readers in Nineteenth-Century France, the latter co-edited with Adrianna M. Paliyenko and Catherine Witt, forthcoming in October.  He is interested in the intersections of literature, music, and philosophy, and is at work on a book on listening in Proust.

 

Is there anything from the nineteenth century you wished would come back into fashion?: Streets lit by . . . 

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Monday, August 31, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2717)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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