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Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Kathryn Ledbetter

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Kathryn Ledbetter is Professor of English at Texas State University. She is author of Victorian Needlework (2012); British Victorian Women’s Periodicals: Civilization, Beauty, and Poetry (2009); Tennyson and Victorian Periodicals: Commodities in Context (2007); “Colour’d Shadows”: Contexts in Publishing, Printing, and Reading Nineteenth-Century British Women Writers (with Terence Hoagwood, 2005); “LEL’s ‘Verses’ and the Keepsake for 1829,” Romantic Circles Electronic Edition (with Terence Hoagwood and Matthew Martin Jacobsen); and The Keepsake (1829), a facsimile edition with introduction and notes (with Terence Hoagwood, 1999). She has published articles in various newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals, including Studies in the Literary Imagination; Victorian Poetry; and the Journal of Victorian Culture. She is also a contributor and former editor of Victorian Periodicals Review.

 

What story do you always tell your students about the nineteenth century? My story is that the nineteenth century is the most exciting moment in modern history because of  . . .


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Monday, August 14, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1770)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Jessica A. Volz

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Dr. Jessica A. Volz of Denver, Colorado is an independent British literature scholar and international communications strategist whose research focuses on the forms and functions of visuality in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century women’s novels. Her latest book, Visuality in the Novels of Austen, Radcliffe, Edgeworth and Burney (London and New York: Anthem Press, March 2017), discusses how visuality — the continuum linking visual and verbal communication — provided women writers with a methodology capable of circumventing the cultural strictures on female expression in a way that concealed resistance within the limits of language. The title offers new insights into verbal economy and the gender politics of the era spanning the Anglo-French War and the Battle of Waterloo by reassessing expression and perception from a uniquely telling point of view.

Dr. Volz holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of St. Andrews and a B.A./M.A. in European Cultural Studies and Journalism from Boston University. She was recently named an ambassador of the Jane Austen Literacy Foundation, which was created to harness the global passion for Jane Austen to fund literacy resources for communities in need across the world. Dr. Volz has also served as the editor of two Colorado legal publications and as a translator for a number of Paris-based companies. In her spare time, she enjoys planning tea parties and plotting novels.

 If you could become any nineteenth-century fictional character, whom would you choose?: While there are many strong female leads in nineteenth-century fiction, . . . 


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Wednesday, May 10, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3332)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Monica Carol Miller

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Dr. Monica Carol Miller is the Assistant Director of the Writing and Communication Program and a Marion L Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech. Her first monograph,  Being Ugly: Southern Women Writers and Social Rebellion will be published by Louisiana State University Press's Southern Literary Studies Series in May 2017. Her work 
focuses on the relationship between gender and region in American literature.

What is your favorite nineteenth-century indoor/outdoor activity?: Dancing, definitely—any kind of “country dances.” I especially love versions of reels and quadrilles—anything that involves . . .

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Friday, April 21, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3134)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Rafael Ocasio

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Rafael Ocasio, Charles A. Dana Professor of Spanish, is a Latin Americanist and a specialist in revolutionary and counterrevolutionary Cuban literature.  He is the author of two books on the Cuban dissident writer Reinaldo Arenas:  Cuba's Political and Sexual Outlaw (University Press of Florida, 2003) and The Making of a Gay Activist (University Press of Florida, 2007).

His book Afro-Cuban Costumbrismo: From Plantations to the Slums (University Press of Florida, 2012) examines the Costumbrista documentation of African and Black religious and musical folklore as part of the development of a national identity in Cuba.  Costumbrismo, a nineteenth-century literary movement associated with the recording of traditions, offers the earliest incorporation of Black themes, related to the booming sugarcane production in Cuba and to rich African traditions in major Cuban cities.

Ocasio is currently working on a book manuscript: Franz Boas in Porto Rico: Retention and Reinvention of Puerto Rican Folklore,” an edited, critical anthology of oral folklore documented by that reputable anthropologist in Puerto Rico in 1915.

He teaches courses on Latin American literature and film and Spanish-language courses at Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia.

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best?: Experience has taught me to be more . . . 

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Monday, April 10, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2383)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Daniel Brown

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Daniel Brown is currently an underemployed independent scholar. He received his Ph.D. in English, with a specialization in British Victorian literature, from the University of Florida in 2012. His research interests include realism, the novel, poetry, Pre-Raphaelitism, painting, photography, relationships between verbal and visual representation, gender (particularly masculinities), and post colonialism. His recent and first book, Representing Realists in Victorian Literature and Criticism (Palgrave MacMillan, 2016), argues that our understanding of realism came about by way of nineteenth-century writers’ attempts to understand what they saw happening in the visual arts. Other publications include a chapter on Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s portrait poems and visual representations of Jane Morris in the forthcoming collection, Poetry in Painting: The Lyrical Voice of Pre-Raphaelite Paintings, edited by Sophia Andres and Brian Donnelly; as well as chapters and articles in Victorians: a Journal of Culture and Literature (Spring 2012), The Blackwell Companion to Sensation Fiction, edited by Pamela K. Gilbert (Blackwell, 2011), and Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies (2007). Future research plans are to delve deeper into “thing theory” and representations of objects in realism.

 

 

In which directions do you think nineteenth-century scholarship should evolve in the near future?: I’d like to see a continuation of the trend towards trying . . . 


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Monday, March 27, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2044)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.3
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