Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Susan Cook and Elizabeth Henley

19 Cents

This week, we are breaking with form and profiling both Susan Cook and Elizabeth Henley, who co-authored the interdisciplinary article, "Reading Communities in the Dickens Classroom" (Pedagogy April 2015). It's a bit of a longer read than normal, so grab a cup of coffee and enjoy!

 

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Monday, April 04, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2942)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Katherine Grenier

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Katherine Haldane Grenier is a Professor of History and Chair of the History Department at The Citadel in Charleston, SC.  She is the author of Tourism and Identity in Scotland: Creating Caledonia (Ashgate, 2005) as well as several articles on tourism in 19th century Scotland.  Her most recent article is “’Public Acts of Faith and Devotion’: Pilgrimages in late 19th century England and Scotland” in Perplext in Faith. Essays on Victorian Beliefs and Doubts, Alissa Clapp-Itnrye and Julie Melnyk, eds. (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 2015).  She is a member of the NCSA Board,  Past President of the Southern Conference on British Studies and was the Local Arrangements Chair of the 2015 meeting of the North American Conference on British Studies. 

What story do you always tell your students about the nineteenth century? Oh, so many to choose from!  Since my students tend to be interested in wars, I always enjoy teaching the . . .


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Monday, March 14, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2874)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Mary Armstrong

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Mary A. Armstrong is Professor of English and Women’s & Gender Studies at Lafayette College in Easton, PA, where she also chairs the Women’s & Gender Studies Program. Her nineteenth-century research interests focus on representations of sexuality and pleasure in the Victorian novel and her work has appeared in venues such as Studies in the Novel, LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory and Nineteenth Century Studies.  She has most recently published on the erotics of the domestic object in Woods’ East Lynne (Victorian Literature and Culture, 2015) and thing theory and interiority in Dickens’ Pictures from Italy (Dickens Quarterly, 2015). Her current project focuses on geographies of female desire in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford and North and South.

Armstrong’s scholarly interests additionally include research on strategies for promoting curricular diversity and institutional inclusivity, particularly around equity issues in higher education STEM fields. To this end, she has been co-PI on two National Science Foundation ADVANCE grants directed at learning more about how to institutionally support underrepresented women faculty in STEM. Her most recent publication in this area is forthcoming in the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education (2016).

 

What was the last book you read? I’ve most recently read Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge, which won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for fiction.  Strout’s marvelous book is essentially . . .

 

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Monday, February 29, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2804)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Susan Matoff

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Susan Matoff is an independent scholar with an MA in English Literature from the University of London.  After a varied non-academic career, Susan studied social history with the Open University and wrote research papers for the Bushey Museum in the United Kingdom.  Her biography, William Jerdan, 1782-1849: London Editor, Author and Critic was published by Sussex Academic Press in 2011.  Her most recent work, Marguerite, Countess of Blessington: The Turbulent Life of a Salonnière and Author was published by University of Delaware Press/Rowman & Littlefield in January 2016.

What nineteenth-century parlour game would you like to see become popular again? Charades and Forfeits and games in which you have to make a spectacle of yourself, are not . . .

 

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Monday, February 15, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2559)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 2.6
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Q&A: Erin Louttit

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Erin Louttit is an independent scholar. She lives in the Netherlands, where she has taught at Radboud University. Her PhD was awarded by the University of St Andrews for her thesis “Rudyard Kipling and Victorian Buddhism”, and her research interests in include literary faiths, gender, popular culture, the supernatural, and Victorian literature and culture. Her hobbies include walking and needlework, and one day if she lives in a larger flat she would like to adopt smelly, scruffy rescue dogs.

 

What was the last book you read?

For regular reading, it was The Young Diana by Marie Corelli. I know that Corelli divided, and still divides, opinion, but I’m willing to say unashamedly that I find her worth reading. I really enjoyed rereading this novel. The Young Diana was published a bit later than some of her better-known novels, but it’s tremendous – science fiction meets conservative feminism combined with a social revenge plot. What’s not to like?

My most recent bedside book was Lady Addle Remembers. It parodies Victorian aristocratic memoirs very amusingly, and the photographs of her charming family members are not to be missed.

 

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? At the risk of sounding horribly flippant, I would say . . .



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Monday, February 01, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2692)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.0
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