Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Monica Carol Miller

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Dr. Monica Carol Miller is the Assistant Director of the Writing and Communication Program and a Marion L Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech. Her first monograph,  Being Ugly: Southern Women Writers and Social Rebellion will be published by Louisiana State University Press's Southern Literary Studies Series in May 2017. Her work focuses on the relationship between gender and region in American literature.

What is your favorite nineteenth-century indoor/outdoor activity?: Dancing, definitely—any kind of “country dances.” I especially love versions of reels and quadrilles—anything that involves . . .

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Friday, April 21, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2483)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Rafael Ocasio

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Rafael Ocasio, Charles A. Dana Professor of Spanish, is a Latin Americanist and a specialist in revolutionary and counterrevolutionary Cuban literature.  He is the author of two books on the Cuban dissident writer Reinaldo Arenas:  Cuba's Political and Sexual Outlaw (University Press of Florida, 2003) and The Making of a Gay Activist (University Press of Florida, 2007).

His book Afro-Cuban Costumbrismo: From Plantations to the Slums (University Press of Florida, 2012) examines the Costumbrista documentation of African and Black religious and musical folklore as part of the development of a national identity in Cuba.  Costumbrismo, a nineteenth-century literary movement associated with the recording of traditions, offers the earliest incorporation of Black themes, related to the booming sugarcane production in Cuba and to rich African traditions in major Cuban cities.

Ocasio is currently working on a book manuscript: Franz Boas in Porto Rico: Retention and Reinvention of Puerto Rican Folklore,” an edited, critical anthology of oral folklore documented by that reputable anthropologist in Puerto Rico in 1915.

He teaches courses on Latin American literature and film and Spanish-language courses at Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia.

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best?: Experience has taught me to be more . . . 

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Monday, April 10, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1779)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Daniel Brown

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Daniel Brown is currently an underemployed independent scholar. He received his Ph.D. in English, with a specialization in British Victorian literature, from the University of Florida in 2012. His research interests include realism, the novel, poetry, Pre-Raphaelitism, painting, photography, relationships between verbal and visual representation, gender (particularly masculinities), and post colonialism. His recent and first book, Representing Realists in Victorian Literature and Criticism (Palgrave MacMillan, 2016), argues that our understanding of realism came about by way of nineteenth-century writers’ attempts to understand what they saw happening in the visual arts. Other publications include a chapter on Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s portrait poems and visual representations of Jane Morris in the forthcoming collection, Poetry in Painting: The Lyrical Voice of Pre-Raphaelite Paintings, edited by Sophia Andres and Brian Donnelly; as well as chapters and articles in Victorians: a Journal of Culture and Literature (Spring 2012), The Blackwell Companion to Sensation Fiction, edited by Pamela K. Gilbert (Blackwell, 2011), and Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies (2007). Future research plans are to delve deeper into “thing theory” and representations of objects in realism.

 

 

In which directions do you think nineteenth-century scholarship should evolve in the near future?: I’d like to see a continuation of the trend towards trying . . . 


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Monday, March 27, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1559)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.3
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Q&A: Molly Youngkin

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Molly Youngkin is Professor of English at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, where she specializes in nineteenth-century British literature and teaches courses in Victorian literature, as well as gender studies and narrative theory. Her first book, Feminist Realism at the Fin de Siècle: The Influence of the Late-Victorian Woman's Press on the Development of the Novel (Ohio State UP, 2007), examines the influence of feminist ideals in the debate over realism in the work of men and women authors writing in the 1890s. She also has published an annotated edition of Sarah Grand’s 1888 novel Ideala (Valancourt Books, 2008), which was one of the earliest New Woman novels and helped lay the foundation for the intellectually independent woman of the 1890s. Her latest book, British Women Writers and the Reception of Ancient Egypt, 1840-1910: Imperialist Representations of Egyptian Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), focuses on British women writers’ knowledge of ancient Egypt and how this knowledge influenced their writings about women’s emancipation.

What was your favorite discovery / serendipitous moment when conducting research on the nineteenth century? Reading about the periodical Shafts in Kate Flint’s The Woman Reader, 1837-1914 and realizing that I had a mine of  . . .

 

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Wednesday, May 04, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3029)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Anna Maria Jones

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Anna Maria Jones is Associate Professor of English at the University of Central Florida, where she also directs What’s Next, a university-wide initiative that focuses on integrative learning to prepare undergraduates to meet their professional, civic, and educational goals. In the Department of English she teaches Victorian and neo-Victorian literature, literary theory, history of the novel, and Japanese anime and manga. She is the author of Problem Novels: Victorian Fiction Theorizes the Sensational Self (Ohio State, 2007) and co-editor, with Rebecca N. Mitchell, of the forthcoming essay collection, Drawing on the Victorians: The Palimpsest of Victorian and Neo-Victorian Graphic Texts (Ohio). Her articles on nineteenth-century topics have appeared in journals such as Novel, LIT: Literature, Interpretation, and Theory, Victorian Literature & Culture, and, most recently, BRANCH. Recent articles on neo-Victorian manga have also appeared in Criticism and Neo-Victorian Studies. Her current monograph project explores transnational and transmedial engagements with and appropriations of the Victorians. She is also working on articles on transnational neo-Victorianism and on the Victorian art of novel writing.

If you had the ability to tour the nineteenth century for one hour and you could visit as many places / events as you could, regardless of distance, how would you build your itinerary? I think I would want to eavesdrop on . . .

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (3545)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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