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Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Attention NCSA Members

NCS Forum

Now that you've submitted your paper proposal for the upcoming conference in Lincoln, please consider writing a review for our online NCS forum. As we've done in the past, we’ve posted a list of possible review titles related to both our previous and our upcoming NCSA conference themes. If you are interested in reviewing a title to maintain momentum engaging with the topic of materiality, or if you want to start thinking about “the new,” check out http://english.selu.edu/ncs/online_reviews.php for guidelines and the review lists. Contact Jennifer Hayward (jhayward@wooster.edu) with ideas.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (1968)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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The Nineteenth Century on Film

Call for Reviews

  As scholars of the long nineteenth century, we benefit from a wealth of films about the people and places we study, from adaptations of novels to biographies of prominent figures, from exposés of crimes and scandals to epics treating historic events.  These films may present the era accurately or bring to life twentieth- and twenty-first-century misconceptions of the Romantic, Victorian, and Edwardian periods, anachronisms and all.  Like any interpretations of earlier historical periods, these films often tell us more about the moment of their creation than the nineteenth-century period in which their narratives take place.   

NCSA’s “The Nineteenth Century on Film” invites reviews and “think pieces” about cinematic representations of the long nineteenth century.  These might include new films currently in theatres, recent films from the past few years, or classic sound and pre-sound films from days gone by, whatever inspires thought and provokes conversation.  We invite writings, formal and informal, 900-1200 words, on a range of topics and approaches limited only by your imagination.  Below, you’ll find a few off-the-shelf lists of films set in the period.  If you’d like to compose something about any relevant film, please contact Arnold Anthony Schmidt at aschmidt@csustan.edu.   

1.) Amazon's List of  Best-Movies-Based-on-Nineteenth-Century-Novels

2.)  Two IMDB  List::    http://www.imdb.com/list/ls057403177/

3.)  http://www.imdb.com/list/ls003020675/

Thursday, September 24, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (2101)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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CALL FOR PAPERS from Graduate Student Caucus of NCSA

“New and Novel Ways of Teaching the Nineteenth Century.”

In the spirit of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association's conference theme, “The New and the Novel in the 19th Century/New Directions in 19th Century Studies," the NCSA Graduate Student Caucus invites submissions for the panel “New and Novel Ways of Teaching the Nineteenth Century.” The panel will be held at the annual meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska on April 13-16, 2016.

One of the greatest challenges of any educator is bringing the past to life in an accessible, engaging way for students. This panel seeks to collect and present innovative ways of teaching the nineteenth century in a college or advanced high school classroom. Topics could include: teaching and discussing nineteenth century texts, incorporating visual and audio material, developing multi-modal and digital assignments, bringing interdisciplinary approaches to the classroom, or teaching the controversial. Papers can focus on an individual assignment or activity or a more general philosophy or pedagogical practice. We also welcome alternative interpretations of the theme.

This panel is open to scholars from all disciplines, although graduate students are particularly encouraged to submit abstracts for consideration. Please email a 250-word abstract and one-page CV to ncsagradcaucus@gmail.com by Monday, September 28, 2015. For more information on NCSA or the 2016 conference, please see http://www.ncsaweb.net/Current-Conference.

The NCSA Graduate Student Caucus

Amy Arbogast, University of Rochester
Angie Blumberg, Saint Louis University
Ashley Rye-Kopec, University of Delaware

Wednesday, September 23, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (1758)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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CALL FOR PAPERS: Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Context

16 and 17 June 2016, King’s College London

It is now over forty years since the bold declaration of psychohistorian Lloyd deMause that ‘The history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken’. Stirred by such claims, scholars have subsequently tested the ‘nightmare thesis’ for both the pre-modern and modern eras, locating children’s agency in unexpected places and stressing the contingencies of context, gender, ethnicity, age, class, caste and sexuality. Narratives of historic and contemporary institutional abuse, however, together with insights concerning the legacies of forced child migration, children’s labours and other challenging aspects of childhood experience, suggest that sorrow rather than joy characterises much scholarship on children and childhood. Should this be so?

In another context, since 1993 the phenomenally successful Horrible Histories books, stage plays and television series have helped introduce countless thousands of children around the world to the past. As their titles indicate, Horrible Histories also examine difficult and sometimes grisly historical episodes. Progressive narratives are at work here too, reinforced by children’s museum exhibits emphasising an emergence from the ‘dark ages’ of childhood in the twentieth century.

‘Horrible Histories? Children’s Lives in Historical Contexts’ is the launch conference marking the inauguration of the new UK-based Children’s History Society. Offering a forum for historical reflections from established and upcoming historians of children, childhood and youth, we also anticipate that this will be a platform for school-age scholars to reflect on the ways they respond to the history. This two-day conference invites paper proposals on the following themes:

·      Dealing with difficult history and heritage

·      Children’s histories and the longue durée

·      The ‘West and the rest’ in children’s history

·      Definitions of subjecthood and status

·      Pain and resilience

·      Archival approaches for retrieving children’s agency

·      The things of childhood

·      Children’s places and places for children

·      Play as protest, recreation and the ‘work’ of childhood

·      Children’s histories in museums, online and in the media

·      The histories of

Wednesday, September 16, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (3241)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Call for Papers: Haunted Europe

Continental Connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film and New Media 9 - 10 June 2016. Leiden University, The Netherlands

Call for Papers: Haunted Europe:

Continental Connections in English-Language Gothic Writing, Film and New Media

9 - 10 June 2016.

Leiden University, The Netherlands

Sunday, August 09, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (2251)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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