Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Free tickets to LA premiere screening of Lou Andreas-Salomé

Cinema Libre Studio invites professors, academics, and staff in the fields of philosophy, psychology, psychoanalysis, history, literature, and women's studies to join us in celebration of the Premiere Screening of LOU Andreas-Salomé in Los Angeles this Thursday April 26, 2018 at 7:00pm.

After a successful opening in the German box office, award winning director Cordula Kablitz-Post is bringing this inspiring and true story of Lou, the world's first female psychoanalyst, author, and rebelous protofeminist to the United States. 

Link to the trailer: www.LouTheFilm.com

RSVPs are needed by April 23https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lou-premiere-los-angeles-invitation-tickets-45090191978

 


 

Thursday, April 19, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (281)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Special Issue of Nineteenth-Century Studies:

Patchwork, Cut-and-Paste, Reassembly

Special Issue of Nineteenth-Century Studies: Patchwork, Cut-and-Paste, Reassembly

 This special issue will focus on ideas of reuse and recombination. How were bits and scraps of materials, textual and otherwise, reassembled into new forms in the nineteenth century? To what ends? Essays might consider these issues in relation to images, fabrics, texts, and more. Possible topics could include scrapbooks, patchwork, quotation, citation, illustration, and any and all forms of recombination. Approaches from all disciplines, including literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences, are welcome, as are submissions that cross national boundaries and/or range across the nineteenth century. One particularly exciting feature of Nineteenth-Century Studies is that the journal encourages authors to enhance their contributions with pertinent artwork.

 

Please submit manuscripts of 8,000-12,000 words, following NCS’s submission guidelines (http://english.selu.edu/ncs/submissions.php) to guest editor Casie LeGette at legette@uga.edu. Early expressions of interest and proposals of topics are also welcome. The initial deadline for submissions of full manuscripts is September 1, 2018, but review will begin June 1, 2018 and earlier submissions are encouraged.

Thursday, April 19, 2018/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (361)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 2.5
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Q&A: Lucy Hartley

19 Cents

Lucy Hartley is a Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan, and previously taught at the University of Southampton. Born and educated in the U.K., she has been at Michigan since 2006 surviving the cold with a lot of help from the wonderful undergraduate and graduate students. She is the author of Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture (2001/2006), and Democratising Beauty in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Art and the Politics of Public Life (2017), and the editor of The History of British Women’s Writing, 1830-1880(forthcoming, 2018). She is currently working on Poverty and Progress: The Whitechapel Project of Henrietta and Samuel Barnett—an intellectual biography of a radical social movement structured around the Whitechapel Fine Art Loan Exhibitions and Toynbee Hall. 

What was your favorite discovery / serendipitous moment when conducting research on the nineteenth century? This would have to be the moment when I came across a . . . 

Click here to read more!


Monday, April 16, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (437)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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CFP: Dickens Studies Annual: Essays on Victorian Fiction

Dickens Studies Annual: Essays on Victorian Fiction invites submissions on all aspects of Dickens’s life and career and also welcomes essays on other Victorian writers of fiction and on the history and aesthetics of Victorian fiction. Click here for more information. 
Monday, April 09, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (282)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Anne Sullivan

19 Cents

Anne Sullivan is a PhD candidate and lecturer at the University of California, Riverside, where she specializes in researching and teaching Victorian literature and media history. Her dissertation, “On Fire: Industrialization, Media Technologies, and the Imagination, 1800-1900,” addresses a gap in literary and media scholarship by recovering the material and affective history of fire as a media technology. Sullivan recently co-edited an issue of 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century with Kate Flint titled “Technologies of Fire in Nineteenth-Century British Culture.” The issue includes an article drawn from the first chapter of her dissertation, which argues that fire-gazing is an outmoded form of producing moving images, as well as essays about mechanical and representational technologies, such as tallow candles and spontaneous combustion, theatrical pyrotechnics, Turner’s fires, volcanic fire, solar flares, fireworks, funeral pyres, and a coal-ship conflagration. In the past few months, Sullivan has begun presenting work from the early stages of her second book project on nineteenth-century astrophotography, which grew out of her own experiments with photographing the Milky Way and the 2016 Perseid meteor shower. 

If you had the ability to tour the nineteenth century for one hour and you could visit as many places / events as you could, regardless of distance, how would you build your itinerary? My journey would begin on a cold November night in Boston to watch the famous . . . 

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Monday, April 02, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (469)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.5
Categories: The 19 Cents Blog
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