Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A Wendy Williams

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Wendy Williams is the Visiting Assistant Professor in the John V. Roach Honors College and the 2014-2015 Honors Professor of the Year at Texas Christian University. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth-century British literature and culture, poetry, and gender studies. Her book, George Eliot, Poetess (Ashgate 2014), represents the first full-length study of the poetry of George Eliot and explores Eliot’s reliance on a poetess tradition that was deeply invested in religion and feminine sympathy.  

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? I would make child abuse (including child labor) a criminal offense.

Who was your favorite professor in graduate school and why? I worked closely with Linda Hughes, who . . .

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Monday, May 11, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1321)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A Kerry Dean Carso

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Kerry Dean Carso is chair and associate professor of art history at the State University of New York at New Paltz in the mid-Hudson Valley, where she teaches courses on American art and architecture. Her research focuses on interconnections between the arts and literature in the nineteenth-century United States. She is the author of American Gothic Art and Architecture in the Age of Romantic Literature (University of Wales Press, 2014), winner of the 2015 Henry-Russell Hitchcock Award from the Victorian Society in America. In fall 2014, she co-edited with Thomas Wermuth an issue of The Hudson River Valley Review on “Painters, Writers, and Tourists in the Nineteenth Century” and contributed an essay to the volume. She is currently researching nineteenth-century garden and park architecture in the United States. In 2014 she was named a “Scholar-In-Residence” at Grey Towers National Historic Site, the ancestral home of conservationist Gifford Pinchot, in Milford, Pennsylvania.

 

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? This year marks the two-hundredth anniversary of the birth of . . .

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Monday, April 27, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1679)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Valerie Austin

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Valerie Austin is the Director of Graduate Studies in Music at the University of North Carolina, Pembroke. With backgrounds in both musicology and music education, Dr. Austin has scholarly interests in the pedagogy of education, early instrumental music, 20th-century American music, and the transmutation of meaning in ballads and folk song. She has presented both musicology and music education topics at national and international forums. Dr. Austin has been named to the 5-person musicology advisory board of the College Music Symposium and is currently finishing several entries for the upcoming Encyclopedia of Antebellum America.  

 

What was the last book you read? I am usually plowing through at least two books at once.  The last book I finished reading was The Sistine Secrets: Michelangelo’s Forbidden Message in the Heart of the Vatican. Art history plays a supporting role in my music history classes and this year my students have been particularly interested in hidden messages in music and art. The book was so intriguing that I worked it into an existing powerpoint and my students say it was their favorite lecture of the year.  Ever interested in science, the other book I have been churning through for months is Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigations of an Ancient American Skeleton

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? The systematic injustices visited on . . .

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Monday, April 27, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2224)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Margaret Samu

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Margaret Samu (pronounced SHAH-moo) teaches at Stern College for Women and Parsons the New School for Design in New York City, and lectures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She works on 18th- and 19th-century European art with a special interest in the intersection between Russian and Western cultures. Her co-edited volume (with Rosalind Blakesley), From Realism to the Silver Age: New Studies in Russian Artistic Culture, appeared in June 2014 with Northern Illinois University Press. Her article “Serving Art: Artist and Model in the Ninteenth-century Russian Art World,” was published in Iskusstvoznanie (Art History, a Moscow publication) in December 2014. Margaret is currently working on a book-length project titled Russian Venus, which is based on the dissertation she completed at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. She served as president of the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) from 2013 until early 2015.

What was the last book you read? Jill Lepore's Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin. Lepore's work on reconstructing Franklin's biography from the scant information available is truly remarkable, but even better is the way she weaves the material together. She is able to explain the gaps and omissions in the documentation to show their significance to Franklin's biography, American history, and the history of women. 

What’s your favorite literary film adaptation? This is Edwardian, part of the so-called long nineteenth century, not before 1900: the Merchant and Ivory adaptation of E.M. Forster's A Room with a View. More recently I've enjoyed Mr. Turner.

Is there anything from the nineteen century you wished would come back into fashion? I wish we . . .

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Monday, April 20, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1838)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Sarah Wadsworth

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SWadsworth Photo CroppedSarah Wadsworth is an Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in English at Marquette University, where she specializes in American literature to 1900, book history, and children’s literature. She is the author of In the Company of Books: Literature and Its “Classes” in Nineteenth-Century America (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006) and coauthor, with Wayne A. Wiegand, of Right Here I See My Own Books: The Woman’s Building Library at the World’s Columbian Exposition (University of Massachusetts Press, 2012). She is currently working on a book about Henry James, periodicals, and American women writers. Her recent article “‘Lifted Moments’: Emily Dickinson, Hymn Revision, and the Revival Music Meme-Plex,” published in The Emily Dickinson Journal (Spring 2014), began life as a conference paper at NCSA. A past president of the History of Reading Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association, she currently serves on the NCSA board of directors and has recently joined the editorial staff of Nineteenth Century Studies.

What historical figure would you love to see in 21st century life? Susan B. Anthony. Anthony accomplished an amazing amount at a time when she had no direct, official political power. In the 21st century, I think she would not only be a powerful voice in national politics but a tireless and much-needed advocate for the rights of women and girls around the world.

What’s your favorite literary film adaptation? Marginally literary, perhaps, and definitely not nineteenth-century, my pick is Adaptation, a quirky, postmodern adaptation of The Orchid Thief, Susan Orlean’s nonfiction account of Florida orchid hunters. It’s more of a meditation on literary adaptation as an unpredictable, creative, and sometimes wildly deviant process than a faithful rendering of Orlean’s text. I love the metacommentary in this film, its humor, its startling clash of literary and popular genres, and its rejection of the idea that an adaptation needs to adhere closely to the original. Besides, Meryl Streep is in it, and she does not disappoint.

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Monday, April 13, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (2744)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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