Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Margaret Linley

19 Cents

Margaret Linley is Associate Professor of English at Simon Fraser University. She is co-editor of Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century: Image, Sound, Touch (2011). Her most recent work appears in Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature (2015); Transport in British Fiction: Technologies of Movement, 1840-1940 (2015); Victorian Studies (2016); Debates in the Digital Humanities (2016); and European Romantic Review (2017). Her current research project is on Lake District writing and literary ecologies. Part of this work involves a database and digitized corpus of Lake District travel to explore applying digital methods for bibliographic and textual analysis (Lake District Online). 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? When I stepped up to the microphone to . . . 

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Thursday, September 14, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (128)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Claire Jarvis

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Claire Jarvis studies British literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with special emphasis on the novel and theories of sexuality. Her first book, Exquisite Masochism: Sex, Marriage and the Novel Form (2016) considers the body's necessity to the novel, an approach that demonstrates the limitations of a critical discourse focused on the deep, interiorized subjectivity of the novel's characters and on symptomatic readings of the marriage plot's conservative impulses. Her readingscentered on Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Anthony Trollope's Can You Forgive Her? and The Way We Live Now, Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure and D. H. Lawrence's Brangwen novelsforeground the suspension of sexual satisfaction, the orchestration of scenes of humiliation with meticulously managed performances and reveals limits of both the Victorian "marriage plot" and contemporary criticism thereof. Jarvis is currently working on a second book project, tentatively titled A Little Britain: Women, Genre, and Form, which analyzes 20th and 21st century novelists' uses of nineteenth century poetic, novelistic and aesthetic theories.  

 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? Too many to count, but one thing stands out as an example of something humiliating . . .

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Monday, August 28, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (151)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.5
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Humphry Davy: Laughing Gas, Literature and the Lamp

FutureLearn MOOC, produced by Lancaster University and the Royal Institution of Great Britain

'Humphry Davy: Laughing gas, literature and the lamp' is a forthcoming FutureLearn MOOC, produced by Lancaster University and the Royal Institution of Great Britain.  

Free online course (MOOC) starting 30 October 2017 - Open to all Sign up today at  http://www.futurelearn.com/courses/humphry-davy

The MOOC is intended for anyone with an interest in Humphry Davy, or early nineteenth century literature, science, or history. It will explore some of the most significant moments of Davy's life and career, including his childhood in Cornwall, his work at the Medical Pneumatic Institution in Bristol and the Royal Institution in London, his writing of poetry, his invention of his miners' safety lamp and the controversy surrounding this, and his European travels. The course will also investigate the relationships that can exist between science and the arts, identify the role that science can play in society, and assess the cultural and political function of science.

The course will start on 30 October 2017, and will run for four weeks. Learners will typically spend three hours per week working through the steps, which will include videos (filmed on location at the Royal Institution), text-based activities and discussion, and quizzes. Learners will be guided at all stages by a specialist team of Educators and Mentors. It's entirely free to participate, and no prior knowledge of Davy is required. 

If you have any questions, please direct them in the first instance to the Lead Educator, Professor Sharon Ruston (s.ruston@lancaster.ac.uk).


Thursday, August 17, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (86)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Kathryn Ledbetter

19 Cents

Kathryn Ledbetter is Professor of English at Texas State University. She is author of Victorian Needlework (2012); British Victorian Women’s Periodicals: Civilization, Beauty, and Poetry (2009); Tennyson and Victorian Periodicals: Commodities in Context (2007); “Colour’d Shadows”: Contexts in Publishing, Printing, and Reading Nineteenth-Century British Women Writers (with Terence Hoagwood, 2005); “LEL’s ‘Verses’ and the Keepsake for 1829,” Romantic Circles Electronic Edition (with Terence Hoagwood and Matthew Martin Jacobsen); and The Keepsake (1829), a facsimile edition with introduction and notes (with Terence Hoagwood, 1999). She has published articles in various newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals, including Studies in the Literary Imagination; Victorian Poetry; and the Journal of Victorian Culture. She is also a contributor and former editor of Victorian Periodicals Review.

 

What story do you always tell your students about the nineteenth century? My story is that the nineteenth century is the most exciting moment in modern history because of  . . .


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Monday, August 14, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (179)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Jessica A. Volz

19 Cents

Dr. Jessica A. Volz of Denver, Colorado is an independent British literature scholar and international communications strategist whose research focuses on the forms and functions of visuality in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century women’s novels. Her latest book, Visuality in the Novels of Austen, Radcliffe, Edgeworth and Burney (London and New York: Anthem Press, March 2017), discusses how visuality — the continuum linking visual and verbal communication — provided women writers with a methodology capable of circumventing the cultural strictures on female expression in a way that concealed resistance within the limits of language. The title offers new insights into verbal economy and the gender politics of the era spanning the Anglo-French War and the Battle of Waterloo by reassessing expression and perception from a uniquely telling point of view.

Dr. Volz holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of St. Andrews and a B.A./M.A. in European Cultural Studies and Journalism from Boston University. She was recently named an ambassador of the Jane Austen Literacy Foundation, which was created to harness the global passion for Jane Austen to fund literacy resources for communities in need across the world. Dr. Volz has also served as the editor of two Colorado legal publications and as a translator for a number of Paris-based companies. In her spare time, she enjoys planning tea parties and plotting novels.

 If you could become any nineteenth-century fictional character, whom would you choose?: While there are many strong female leads in nineteenth-century fiction, . . . 


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Wednesday, May 10, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1050)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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