Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Meegan Kennedy

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Meegan Kennedy is an Associate Professor of English and Core Faculty in History and Philosophy of Science at Florida State University, where she teaches Victorian literature, history of the novel, and the history of nineteenth-century science and medicine.

Her book, Revising the Clinic: Vision and Representation in Victorian Medical Narrative and the Novel (2010), studies physicians' and novelists' shared strategies for observing and recording the body. The book focuses on the developing debates over clinical realism; it’s newly reissued in paperback.

She recently received a yearlong NEH fellowship for her current project, “Beautiful Mechanism: The Bounds of Wonder in the Victorian Microscope,” which examines Victorians' fearful romance with this technology and what she calls the “skeptical sublime.” In other projects, she studies the social and intellectual networks of Victorian microscopy, and examines the interplay in British novels and medicine between visual and numerical narratives (illustrations, figures, tables, and charts) and textual ones.

What was the last experience that made you a stronger scholar-teacher? A recent experience that made me a stronger scholar-teacher was working on the paper I gave on “Canada balsam” (the . . . 

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (57)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Meri-Jane Rochelson

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Meri-Jane Rochelson, a past president of NCSA, is Professor Emerita of English at Florida International University, where she was affiliated with the programs in Women’s and Gender Studies and Jewish Studies.  She is the author of A Jew in the Public Arena: The Career of Israel Zangwill (2008), editor of Zangwill’s 1892 novel Children of the Ghetto (1998), and co-editor of Transforming Genres: New Approaches to British Fiction of the 1890s (1994).  Meri-Jane has just completed a Broadview Edition of Israel Zangwill’s 1908 play The Melting-Pot, which should be available for spring course adoption. A more personal monograph, Eli’s Story: A Twentieth-Century Jewish Life, is forthcoming next summer.

What was your most exciting nineteenth-century research discovery? My most exciting research discovery was finding a trove of approximately 300 letters and postcards from the late-Victorian fiction writer . . . 

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Thursday, October 26, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (178)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Nathan K. Hensley

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Nathan K. Hensley is Assistant Professor of English at Georgetown University. His research focuses on nineteenth-century British literature, critical theory, environmental humanities, and the novel. Other interests include Anglophone modernism and the cultures of globalization. His first book project, Forms of Empire: The Poetics of Victorian Sovereignty (2016), explores how Victorian writers expanded the capacities of literary form to account for the ongoing violence of liberal modernity. A second project, now in its early stages, draws on Victorian and contemporary ecological thinking to investigate how the nineteenth century imagined systems and the failure of those systems. With Philip Steer (Massey University, NZ), he is currently co-editing a collection of essays, Ecological Form: System and Aesthetics in the Age of Empire(Fordham UP, forthcoming 2018). His scholarship has appeared in Victorian StudiesNovel: A Forum on FictionNineteenth Century ContextsVictorian Periodicals Review, and other venues. 

 

In which directions do you think nineteenth-century scholarship should evolve in the near future? I think that nineteenth-century studies is in an amazingly strong . . .

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Monday, October 16, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (360)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Brenda Ayres

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Dr. Brenda Ayres is a full professor of English and member of the graduate faculty at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, where she has taught since 2003. She has published extensively in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature with a total of over 170 articles and 32 book publications. Her 2017 book publications are Biographical Misrepresentations of British Women Writers: A Hall of Mirrors and the Long Nineteenth Century (Palgrave Macmillan), Betwixt and Between the Biographies of Mary Wollstonecraft (Anthem). In 2018 she will publish Marie Corelli: Woman Writer WarriorVictorians and Their Animals: Beast on a Leash, and hopefully at least two if not four more books on Wollstonecraft that are ready for publishers.

If you had the ability to tour the nineteenth century for one hour and you could visit as many places / events as you could, regardless of distance, how would you build your itinerary? I would love to go to . . . 

 

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Monday, October 02, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (268)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Margaret Linley

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Margaret Linley is Associate Professor of English at Simon Fraser University. She is co-editor of Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century: Image, Sound, Touch (2011). Her most recent work appears in Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature (2015); Transport in British Fiction: Technologies of Movement, 1840-1940 (2015); Victorian Studies (2016); Debates in the Digital Humanities (2016); and European Romantic Review (2017). Her current research project is on Lake District writing and literary ecologies. Part of this work involves a database and digitized corpus of Lake District travel to explore applying digital methods for bibliographic and textual analysis (Lake District Online). 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? When I stepped up to the microphone to . . . 

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Thursday, September 14, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (300)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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