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Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Ani Kokobobo

19 Cents

Ani Kokobobo received her B.A. from Dartmouth (2005) and Ph.D. from Columbia University (2011). She is currently Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Slavic Department at the University of Kansas as well as editor of the Tolstoy Studies Journal. She has published a monograph, Russian Grotesque Realism: The Great Reforms and Gentry Decline (Ohio State University Press, 2018), as well as two coedited volumes: Russian Writers and the Fin de Siècle—The Twilight of Realism (Cambridge University Press, 2015); and Russia’s Regional Identities: The Power of the Provinces (Routledge, 2018). She has written over 20 academic articles, and her writing for the public has appeared in The Washington Post, Salon.com, The New Republic, Business Insider, and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

What are you doing in the nineteenth-century classroom that incorporates Digital Humanities / New Media scholarship? I taught a course on Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace and digital humanities a couple of years ago...

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Saturday, April 13, 2019/Author: David Agruss/Number of views (1218)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 3.0
Categories: The 19 Cents Blog

Q&A: Lucy Hartley

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Lucy Hartley is a Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan, and previously taught at the University of Southampton. Born and educated in the U.K., she has been at Michigan since 2006 surviving the cold with a lot of help from the wonderful undergraduate and graduate students. She is the author of Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture (2001/2006), and Democratising Beauty in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Art and the Politics of Public Life (2017), and the editor of The History of British Women’s Writing, 1830-1880 (forthcoming, 2018). She is currently working on Poverty and Progress: The Whitechapel Project of Henrietta and Samuel Barnett—an intellectual biography of a radical social movement structured around the Whitechapel Fine Art Loan Exhibitions and Toynbee Hall.  

 

What was your favorite discovery / serendipitous moment when conducting research on the nineteenth century? This would have to be the moment when I came across a...

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Monday, April 16, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1813)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
Categories: The 19 Cents Blog

Q&A: Kyla Schuller

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Kyla Schuller is Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, where she investigates the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, and the sciences. Her book The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century (Duke University Press, 2018) exposes sentimentalism as a technology of population management. Her work has been supported by the ACLS and Stanford Humanities Center and has appeared in American QuarterlyGLQConfigurationsThe Leviathan, and other venues.

What story do you always tell your students about the nineteenth century? I often tell my students about the so-called “orphan trains,” or the migration of 200,000 youth from . . . 

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Monday, March 19, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1774)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
Categories: The 19 Cents Blog

Q&A: Keridiana (Kery) Chez

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Keridiana (Kery) Chez is Assistant Professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, where she teaches first year writing, children’s literature, and animals in literature. Her first book, Victorian Dogs, Victorian Men: Affect and Animals in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture (2017), explores how the bourgeoisie on both sides of the Atlantic developed the use of animal companions as emotional prostheses. Particularly, the book is interested in novels by Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Margaret Marshall Saunders, Bram Stoker, and Jack London, which participated in producing gender discourses by regulating the degree and manner of intimacy between species. Chez’s other recent projects include essays on the nineteenth-century regulation of animal feed, the gender politics of nineteenth-century pet preferences (cats v. dogs), and the mandrakes in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Her research interests encompass animal studies, gender studies, empire, race/ethnicity studies, technoscience/cyborg studies, utopias and dystopias, and American jurisprudence. 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? The academic job market is infamously brutal, and more than once . . . 

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Monday, January 22, 2018/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (1935)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.8
Categories: The 19 Cents Blog