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Q&A: Emily C. Burns

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Emily C. Burns is Associate Professor of Art History at Auburn University, where she teaches courses on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European and American art. Burns’s research analyzes the circulation of artists and objects in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and interprets the ways mobility shapes visual culture and cultural discourses of nationalism. Her book Transnational Frontiers: the American West in France (University of Oklahoma Press, 2018) analyzes appropriations of the American West in France in performance and in visual and material culture among the tripartite international relationships of the United States, France, and the Lakota Nation between 1867 and 1914. She also recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Transatlantica on the American West in France, featuring eight essays on the theme. Her current book project, Performing Innocence: Cultural Belatedness and U.S. Art in Fin-de-Siècle Paris, revises and expands her dissertation, completed at Washington University in St. Louis, to analyze constructions of U.S. cultural innocence in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France. Her research has been supported by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Baird Library Society of Fellows, the Walter Read Hovey Memorial Foundation, the University of Nottingham, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, the New England Regional Library Consortium, and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming.

What is your favorite film set in the nineteenth century? ...

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Saturday, September 21, 2019/Author: Christa DiMarco/Number of views (9)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Sebastian Lecourt

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Sebastian Lecourt received his Ph.D. from Yale University and is currently an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Houston. His research focuses on Victorian literature and questions of secularization, colonialism, and comparativism. His first book, Cultivating Belief: Victorian Anthropology, Liberal Aesthetics, and the Secular Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2018), considers a group of liberal intellectuals who debated whether religion was a matter of individual belief or of cultural identity, and shows how this distinction became central to liberal understandings of aesthetic agency. Lecourt is currently working on a second book project entitled The Genres of Comparative Religion, 1783-1927, which considers the role that literary forms played in constructing the nineteenth-century canon of “world religions.” His essays have appeared in PMLA, Representations, Victorian Studies, Victorian Literature and Culture, and other journals.


What is one of your favorite nineteenth-century quotations? Early in my dissertation work I came across this line in Matthew Arnold’s Literature and Dogma...


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Wednesday, September 11, 2019/Author: David Agruss/Number of views (198)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Nan Z. Da

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Nan Z. Da teaches literary theory, nineteenth-century American literature, and courses related to China at the University of Notre Dame. She is the author of Intransitive Encounter: Sino-U.S. Literatures and the Limits of Exchange, a theory of non-demonstrative exchanges (Columbia University Press, 2018). Her work has appeared in American Literary History, Avidly, Chronicle Review, Critical Inquiry, The Henry James Review, J19, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Public Books, Signs, Times Literary SupplementThe Hedgehog Review, The Threepenny Review, and The Yale Review. She is currently working on an academic monograph called Tracking Devices and a critical memoir that pairs personal tragedies from modern China with Shakespeare'sKing Lear. With Professor Anahid Nersessian, she editsThinking Literature, a series dedicated to literary criticism sponsored by the University of Chicago Press.

What was your favorite discovery / serendipitous moment when conducting research on the nineteenth century?There is lost silent film called...

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Saturday, August 24, 2019/Author: Christa DiMarco/Number of views (408)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Suzanne Singletary

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Suzanne Singletary received her Ph.D. from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, in 2007. She is Professor in the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Thomas Jefferson University, where she teaches the history and theory of art, architecture, and photography. Currently she serves as Associate Dean for New Academic Initiatives and Graduate Studies and is Director of the M.S. in Historic Preservation and of the Center for the Preservation of Modernism. Her research interests include interdisciplinary aspects of art, architecture, literature, and music. She has participated in international symposia and been an invited speaker at the National Gallery of Washington, D.C., the National Gallery of London, the Tate Britain, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She has published articles on Eugène Delacroix, French Symbolism, and Francesco Goya and has contributed essays to Impressionist Interiors (National Gallery of Ireland 2008), Perspectives on Manet (Ashgate 2012), and Rival Sisters (Ashgate 2014). Her book James McNeill Whistler and France: A Dialogue in Paint, Poetry, and Music was published by Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group (2017).

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? Getting a critical peer review of a...

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Thursday, May 23, 2019/Author: Christa DiMarco/Number of views (814)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Andrea Henderson

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Andrea Henderson is professor of English at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Romantic Identities: Varieties of Subjectivity, 1774-1830 (Cambridge University Press, 1996) and Romanticism and the Painful Pleasures of Modern Life (Cambridge University Press, 2008). Her most recent book, Algebraic Art: Mathematical Formalism and Victorian Culture (Oxford University Press, 2018), is a study of formal abstraction in Victorian mathematics and literature.

What was the last experience that made you a stronger scholar-teacher? I recently had a series of student conferences that left me feeling...

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Monday, May 13, 2019/Author: David Agruss/Number of views (703)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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