Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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NCSA 2017 Conference Update!

2-4 Feb Charleston, S.C.

 
We are excited to announce our keynote speaker for Charleston 2017.  Maurie D. McInnis studies the history of art, architecture, and material culture of the colonial and antebellum South, and her research has frequently focused on Charleston subjects. Her publications include Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade (2011), which was awarded the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Charles C. Eldredge Prize and the Library of Virginia Literary Award for Non-Fiction; and The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston (2005), which received awards from the Society of Architectural Historians and the Association for the Preservation of Artifacts and Landscapes.  McInnis’s work has frequently intersected with public history, and she has served on advisory committees addressing interpretations of slavery at both Monticello and Mount Vernon.  Recently appointed executive vice president and provost of The University of Texas at Austin, McInnis previously served as professor of art history and vice provost for academic affairs at the University of Virginia.  Her most recent research examines equestrian monuments and power.  As we consider the contested terrain of “Memory and Commemoration” we look forward to welcoming Dr. McInnis to our Charleston conference.
 
 
Best,
Kathy Grenier
Amanda Mushal
Monday, July 11, 2016/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (36)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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CALL FOR PAPERS: Scale of Nature: Long Nineteenth Century Culture and The Great Chain of Being

Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and Centre for Visual Arts and Culture Durham University, UK

Monday, July 11, 2016/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (42)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Special Issue Call for Papers

WOMEN’S WRITING “Generations” Winter 2017 Issue


In honor of the 25th anniversary of the British Women Writers Association in 2017, Women’s Writing invites submissions for a special issue on the theme of “Generations.” While generational transitions are often productive and even revolutionary, they are seldom ever easy or smooth. Such transitions may be accompanied by paradigm shifts, struggles to be heard, or difficulty letting go. In this spirit, the editors especially welcome investigations into the complexities of generational exchange and transition in the field of women’s writing.

Papers may focus on generation as a biological, cultural, social, historical, or political process as well as on attendant manifestations in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature and contemporary scholarly discourses. Explorations should illuminate shifts in literary studies, women’s writing, and/or critical practice.

Topics may included but are not limited to: mentoring relationships, conflicts across the generations, literary periodization, models of literary production, theories of regeneration, reproduction and maternity, feminist prehistories, and the future of women’s writing.

We invite essays of 4,000-7,000 words in length (including notes) for the Winter 2017 issue.

Please submit abstracts of 200 words to the editors, Doreen Thierauf and Lauren Pinkerton (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) at generations2017@unc.edu, by August 1, 2016.

Complete essays will be due February 1, 2017. Please prepare contributions according to MLA style (8th edition) and in accordance with the journal’s author guidelines and style sheet (to be accessed on this page: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/layout/style_rwow.pdf).
Friday, June 10, 2016/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (111)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Call for Papers: British Women Writers Conference

UNC-Chapel Hill, June 22-25, 2017

British Women Writers Association
contact email:   bwwc2017@gmail.com

For its 25th annual meeting, the British Women Writers Conference invites papers and panel proposals considering the theme of “Generations.” As we look back on a quarter-century of feminist scholarship and practice within British Studies, we want to celebrate those who have defined the British Women Writers Association’s past and nurture those who will shape its future. Of course, even within literary traditions or scholarly networks, generational transitions are rarely ever easy or smooth. Such transitions may be accompanied by paradigm shifts, struggles to be heard, or difficulty letting go. We therefore welcome investigations into the complexities of generational exchange and transition in women’s writing. Papers may focus on generation as a biological, cultural, social, historical, or political process as well as on attendant manifestations in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature and contemporary scholarly discourses. In the end, we hope that a comprehensive exploration of generations will help illuminate shifts in literary studies, women’s writing, and critical practice. For more information:
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2016/05/19/british-women-writers-conference-at-unc-chapel-hill-june-22-25-2017

Monday, June 06, 2016/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (114)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Molly Youngkin

19 Cents

Molly Youngkin is Professor of English at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, where she specializes in nineteenth-century British literature and teaches courses in Victorian literature, as well as gender studies and narrative theory. Her first book, Feminist Realism at the Fin de Siècle: The Influence of the Late-Victorian Woman's Press on the Development of the Novel (Ohio State UP, 2007), examines the influence of feminist ideals in the debate over realism in the work of men and women authors writing in the 1890s. She also has published an annotated edition of Sarah Grand’s 1888 novel Ideala (Valancourt Books, 2008), which was one of the earliest New Woman novels and helped lay the foundation for the intellectually independent woman of the 1890s. Her latest book, British Women Writers and the Reception of Ancient Egypt, 1840-1910: Imperialist Representations of Egyptian Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), focuses on British women writers’ knowledge of ancient Egypt and how this knowledge influenced their writings about women’s emancipation.

What was your favorite discovery / serendipitous moment when conducting research on the nineteenth century? Reading about the periodical Shafts in Kate Flint’s The Woman Reader, 1837-1914 and realizing that I had a mine of  . . .

 

Click here to read more!

Wednesday, May 04, 2016/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (519)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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