Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.

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Q&A Linda Gertner Zatlin

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Linda Gertner Zatlin is Professor of English at Morehouse College, where she teaches nineteenth-century British poetry, prose, and the novel. She has written two monographs on Aubrey Beardsley, Beardsley, Japonisme, and the Perversion of the Victorian Ideal (Cambridge University Press, 1997) and Aubrey Beardsley and Victorian Sexual Politics (Oxford University Press, 1990). With the British art critic Simon Wilson she co-curated a 1997-98 exhibition in Japan, Aubrey Beardsley: A Centenary Tribute, for which they co-wrote the first scholarly exhibition catalogue. In March 2016, Yale University Press (London) will release her two-volume Aubrey Beardsley: A Catalogue Raisonné, which brings together for the first time Beardsley's 1250+ drawings (splendidly reproduced by Yale). She is currently working on a revision of Beardsley’s letters, into which she will interpolate 114 unpublished, previously unknown letters, that she found in auction catalogues, online, and in private and public collections. A co-founder of NCSA, Linda currently serves on its Senior Advisory Committee and the editorial board of Nineteenth Century Studies.

 

Is there anything from the nineteenth century you wish would come back into fashion? I would love to experience the tradition begun in the late 1880s of . . .

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Monday, May 25, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (31)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.5
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Q&A Caroline McCracken-Flesher

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Caroline McCracken-Flesher is a Professor of English at the University of Wyoming. Though primarily a Victorianist, she researches extensively in pursuit of the novel, and in every direction in Scottish Studies. Her books include Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford, 2005), The Doctor Dissected: A Cultural Autopsy of the Burke and Hare Murders (Oxford, 2012) and an MLA volume of Approaches to Teaching the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson (2012). She is working on a scholarly edition of Kidnapped, and is co-editing The Edinburgh Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Writers with Alan Riach. In process of investigating Burke and Hare and the literary afterlives of their many crimes, she became intrigued by David Pae's novel Mary Paterson, or, The Fatal Error (1864-65). Pae was a successful serial novelist, writing  for the Dundee People’s Journal. Featuring contributions from its readers, and highly popular and readable serials from authors like Pae, the Journal became widely distributed. Mary Paterson, with the murder everyone knew was coming mid-way through the book, boosted sales across the country. Dr. McCracken-Flesher’s edition of Mary Paterson is available this June from the Association for Scottish Literary Studies. 

 

What was the last book you read? I just finished reading Tim Baker’s Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition, and Megan Coyer and David Shuttleton’s edited volume Scottish Medicine and Literary Culture, 1726-1832. They are the kind of expansive . . .

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Monday, May 18, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (188)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 1.0
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Q&A Wendy Williams

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Wendy Williams is the Visiting Assistant Professor in the John V. Roach Honors College and the 2014-2015 Honors Professor of the Year at Texas Christian University. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth-century British literature and culture, poetry, and gender studies. Her book, George Eliot, Poetess (Ashgate 2014), represents the first full-length study of the poetry of George Eliot and explores Eliot’s reliance on a poetess tradition that was deeply invested in religion and feminine sympathy.  

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? I would make child abuse (including child labor) a criminal offense.

Who was your favorite professor in graduate school and why? I worked closely with Linda Hughes, who . . .

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Monday, May 11, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (60)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A Kerry Dean Carso

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Kerry Dean Carso is chair and associate professor of art history at the State University of New York at New Paltz in the mid-Hudson Valley, where she teaches courses on American art and architecture. Her research focuses on interconnections between the arts and literature in the nineteenth-century United States. She is the author of American Gothic Art and Architecture in the Age of Romantic Literature (University of Wales Press, 2014), winner of the 2015 Henry-Russell Hitchcock Award from the Victorian Society in America. In fall 2014, she co-edited with Thomas Wermuth an issue of The Hudson River Valley Review on “Painters, Writers, and Tourists in the Nineteenth Century” and contributed an essay to the volume. She is currently researching nineteenth-century garden and park architecture in the United States. In 2014 she was named a “Scholar-In-Residence” at Grey Towers National Historic Site, the ancestral home of conservationist Gifford Pinchot, in Milford, Pennsylvania.

 

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? This year marks the two-hundredth anniversary of the birth of . . .

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Monday, April 27, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (169)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A Valerie Austin

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Valerie Austin is the Director of Graduate Studies in Music at the University of North Carolina, Pembroke. With backgrounds in both musicology and music education, Dr. Austin has scholarly interests in the pedagogy of education, early instrumental music, 20th-century American music, and the transmutation of meaning in ballads and folk song. She has presented both musicology and music education topics at national and international forums. Dr. Austin has been named to the 5-person musicology advisory board of the College Music Symposium and is currently finishing several entries for the upcoming Encyclopedia of Antebellum America.  

 

What was the last book you read? I am usually plowing through at least two books at once.  The last book I finished reading was The Sistine Secrets: Michelangelo’s Forbidden Message in the Heart of the Vatican. Art history plays a supporting role in my music history classes and this year my students have been particularly interested in hidden messages in music and art. The book was so intriguing that I worked it into an existing powerpoint and my students say it was their favorite lecture of the year.  Ever interested in science, the other book I have been churning through for months is Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigations of an Ancient American Skeleton

If you could go back to the nineteenth century to change one thing, what would it be? The systematic injustices visited on . . .

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Monday, April 27, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (173)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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