Welcome

Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.


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Q&A: Nathan K. Hensley

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Nathan K. Hensley is Assistant Professor of English at Georgetown University. His research focuses on nineteenth-century British literature, critical theory, environmental humanities, and the novel. Other interests include Anglophone modernism and the cultures of globalization. His first book project, Forms of Empire: The Poetics of Victorian Sovereignty (2016), explores how Victorian writers expanded the capacities of literary form to account for the ongoing violence of liberal modernity. A second project, now in its early stages, draws on Victorian and contemporary ecological thinking to investigate how the nineteenth century imagined systems and the failure of those systems. With Philip Steer (Massey University, NZ), he is currently co-editing a collection of essays, Ecological Form: System and Aesthetics in the Age of Empire(Fordham UP, forthcoming 2018). His scholarship has appeared in Victorian StudiesNovel: A Forum on FictionNineteenth Century ContextsVictorian Periodicals Review, and other venues. 

 

In which directions do you think nineteenth-century scholarship should evolve in the near future? I think that nineteenth-century studies is in an amazingly strong . . .

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Monday, October 16, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (216)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Brenda Ayres

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Dr. Brenda Ayres is a full professor of English and member of the graduate faculty at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, where she has taught since 2003. She has published extensively in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature with a total of over 170 articles and 32 book publications. Her 2017 book publications are Biographical Misrepresentations of British Women Writers: A Hall of Mirrors and the Long Nineteenth Century (Palgrave Macmillan), Betwixt and Between the Biographies of Mary Wollstonecraft (Anthem). In 2018 she will publish Marie Corelli: Woman Writer WarriorVictorians and Their Animals: Beast on a Leash, and hopefully at least two if not four more books on Wollstonecraft that are ready for publishers.

If you had the ability to tour the nineteenth century for one hour and you could visit as many places / events as you could, regardless of distance, how would you build your itinerary? I would love to go to . . . 

 

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Monday, October 02, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (126)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Margaret Linley

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Margaret Linley is Associate Professor of English at Simon Fraser University. She is co-editor of Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century: Image, Sound, Touch (2011). Her most recent work appears in Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature (2015); Transport in British Fiction: Technologies of Movement, 1840-1940 (2015); Victorian Studies (2016); Debates in the Digital Humanities (2016); and European Romantic Review (2017). Her current research project is on Lake District writing and literary ecologies. Part of this work involves a database and digitized corpus of Lake District travel to explore applying digital methods for bibliographic and textual analysis (Lake District Online). 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? When I stepped up to the microphone to . . . 

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Thursday, September 14, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (213)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Q&A: Claire Jarvis

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Claire Jarvis studies British literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with special emphasis on the novel and theories of sexuality. Her first book, Exquisite Masochism: Sex, Marriage and the Novel Form (2016) considers the body's necessity to the novel, an approach that demonstrates the limitations of a critical discourse focused on the deep, interiorized subjectivity of the novel's characters and on symptomatic readings of the marriage plot's conservative impulses. Her readingscentered on Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Anthony Trollope's Can You Forgive Her? and The Way We Live Now, Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure and D. H. Lawrence's Brangwen novelsforeground the suspension of sexual satisfaction, the orchestration of scenes of humiliation with meticulously managed performances and reveals limits of both the Victorian "marriage plot" and contemporary criticism thereof. Jarvis is currently working on a second book project, tentatively titled A Little Britain: Women, Genre, and Form, which analyzes 20th and 21st century novelists' uses of nineteenth century poetic, novelistic and aesthetic theories.  

 

Have you ever had something happen to you professionally that you thought was bad but turned out to be for the best? Too many to count, but one thing stands out as an example of something humiliating . . .

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Monday, August 28, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (246)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.5
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Humphry Davy: Laughing Gas, Literature and the Lamp

FutureLearn MOOC, produced by Lancaster University and the Royal Institution of Great Britain

'Humphry Davy: Laughing gas, literature and the lamp' is a forthcoming FutureLearn MOOC, produced by Lancaster University and the Royal Institution of Great Britain.  

Free online course (MOOC) starting 30 October 2017 - Open to all Sign up today at  http://www.futurelearn.com/courses/humphry-davy

The MOOC is intended for anyone with an interest in Humphry Davy, or early nineteenth century literature, science, or history. It will explore some of the most significant moments of Davy's life and career, including his childhood in Cornwall, his work at the Medical Pneumatic Institution in Bristol and the Royal Institution in London, his writing of poetry, his invention of his miners' safety lamp and the controversy surrounding this, and his European travels. The course will also investigate the relationships that can exist between science and the arts, identify the role that science can play in society, and assess the cultural and political function of science.

The course will start on 30 October 2017, and will run for four weeks. Learners will typically spend three hours per week working through the steps, which will include videos (filmed on location at the Royal Institution), text-based activities and discussion, and quizzes. Learners will be guided at all stages by a specialist team of Educators and Mentors. It's entirely free to participate, and no prior knowledge of Davy is required. 

If you have any questions, please direct them in the first instance to the Lead Educator, Professor Sharon Ruston (s.ruston@lancaster.ac.uk).


Thursday, August 17, 2017/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (152)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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