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Welcome to the Nineteenth Century Studies Association website, where we hope you will find information about the Association, its interests and outlets, as well as enticements to join in the many conversations we have on and beyond these pages.

We are an interdisciplinary Association interested in exploring all aspects of the long nineteenth century, from science to music, from architecture to religion, from movement to literatures—and beyond. We hope you will peruse these pages as a volume inviting you to join us at our annual spring meeting, and we ask you to join our community of those with nineteenth century interests.

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Q&A Margaret Samu

19 Cents

Margaret Samu (pronounced SHAH-moo) teaches at Stern College for Women and Parsons the New School for Design in New York City, and lectures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She works on 18th- and 19th-century European art with a special interest in the intersection between Russian and Western cultures. Her co-edited volume (with Rosalind Blakesley), From Realism to the Silver Age: New Studies in Russian Artistic Culture, appeared in June 2014 with Northern Illinois University Press. Her article “Serving Art: Artist and Model in the Ninteenth-century Russian Art World,” was published in Iskusstvoznanie (Art History, a Moscow publication) in December 2014. Margaret is currently working on a book-length project titled Russian Venus, which is based on the dissertation she completed at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. She served as president of the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) from 2013 until early 2015.

What was the last book you read? Jill Lepore's Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin. Lepore's work on reconstructing Franklin's biography from the scant information available is truly remarkable, but even better is the way she weaves the material together. She is able to explain the gaps and omissions in the documentation to show their significance to Franklin's biography, American history, and the history of women. 

What’s your favorite literary film adaptation? This is Edwardian, part of the so-called long nineteenth century, not before 1900: the Merchant and Ivory adaptation of E.M. Forster's A Room with a View. More recently I've enjoyed Mr. Turner.

Is there anything from the nineteen century you wished would come back into fashion? I wish we . . .

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Monday, April 20, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (16)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Sarah Wadsworth

19 Cents

 

SWadsworth Photo CroppedSarah Wadsworth is an Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in English at Marquette University, where she specializes in American literature to 1900, book history, and children’s literature. She is the author of In the Company of Books: Literature and Its “Classes” in Nineteenth-Century America (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006) and coauthor, with Wayne A. Wiegand, of Right Here I See My Own Books: The Woman’s Building Library at the World’s Columbian Exposition (University of Massachusetts Press, 2012). She is currently working on a book about Henry James, periodicals, and American women writers. Her recent article “‘Lifted Moments’: Emily Dickinson, Hymn Revision, and the Revival Music Meme-Plex,” published in The Emily Dickinson Journal (Spring 2014), began life as a conference paper at NCSA. A past president of the History of Reading Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association, she currently serves on the NCSA board of directors and has recently joined the editorial staff of Nineteenth Century Studies.

What historical figure would you love to see in 21st century life? Susan B. Anthony. Anthony accomplished an amazing amount at a time when she had no direct, official political power. In the 21st century, I think she would not only be a powerful voice in national politics but a tireless and much-needed advocate for the rights of women and girls around the world.

What’s your favorite literary film adaptation? Marginally literary, perhaps, and definitely not nineteenth-century, my pick is Adaptation, a quirky, postmodern adaptation of The Orchid Thief, Susan Orlean’s nonfiction account of Florida orchid hunters. It’s more of a meditation on literary adaptation as an unpredictable, creative, and sometimes wildly deviant process than a faithful rendering of Orlean’s text. I love the metacommentary in this film, its humor, its startling clash of literary and popular genres, and its rejection of the idea that an adaptation needs to adhere closely to the original. Besides, Meryl Streep is in it, and she does not disappoint.

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Monday, April 13, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (49)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A Maura Coughlin

19 Cents

https://19thcentstudies.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/maura-coughlin.jpgMaura Coughlin is associate professor of visual studies in the department of English and Cultural Studies at Bryant University in Smithfield, Rhode Island.  Trained as an  historian of nineteenth-century European art (PhD New York University, 2001), her current research on visual culture in Brittany is informed by material cultural studies, ecocriticism, feminist theory and cultural geography. She a member of the Material Collective and a frequent participant in the Babel Working Group. A sabbatical over the last year provided Coughlin with the opportunity to work on her book, Materiality and Ecology in the Visual Culture of Brittany, 1880-1914, and, among other things, she started blogging about visual culture in France:  http://materialbrittany.blogspot.com/


What was the last book you read? The last book I read is Roger Sansi Art, Anthropology and the Gift (2014). I have been teaching a senior seminar in which we are reading widely on creativity and the arts in public culture and we began the semester with some selections from Lewis Hyde’s classic text, The Gift. Of late, I am also obsessed with John Berger’s prescient observations about the material knowledge that one gains in living a rural life, and find myself continually finding connections between his thoughts in the 1970s, later 19th century visual culture and the work of recent scholars interested in New Materialism and Relational Aesthetics in contemporary art.

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Monday, April 06, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (30)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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WANTED: Co-editor

Nineteenth Century Studies.

WANTED: Co-editor to join the editorial team of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association’s journal, Nineteenth Century Studies. Duties may include soliciting and corresponding with readers (from the NCSA and NCS boards as well as from the broader scholarly community) for vetting submissions to the journal; editing accepted submissions for substance and fact-checking as needed (not copyediting); and participating in other decisions about journal business with the editorial team. The position is unpaid and voluntary but will enable the right candidate to gain further editorial experience and expertise along with the pleasure of seeing exceptional scholarship into print. Applicants should be established scholars in their field of nineteenth-century studies; all disciplines considered, but interdisciplinary commitment necessary. Editorial experience preferred but not essential.

Please submit a letter of interest and vita to ncs@selu.edu by 1 May 2015.

Sunday, March 29, 2015/Author: Maura Coughlin/Number of views (284)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Q&A: Cynthia Patterson

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Cynthia PattersonCynthia Patterson is an Associate Professor at the University of South Florida, and the Undergraduate Program Director for the English department. She co-edits the journal American Periodicals. Her first book, Art for the Middle Classes: America’s Illustrated Magazines of the 1840s (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2010), won sole “Honorable Mention” in the Research Society for American Periodicals/EBSCOhost 2011 Book Prize contest. Research presented at the 2010 NCSA conference resulted in a 2014 article published in the Journal of American Studies, “Performative Morality: Godey’ s Match Plates, Nineteenth-Century Stage Practice, and Social/Political/ Economic Commentary in America’s Popular Ladies’ Magazine” (48.2, 613-637). Research presented at the 2012 NCSA conference resulted in a forthcoming article to be published in Southern Quarterly, “The Caroline Howard Gilman We Don’t Know: Recuperating Gilman’s Work for the Charleston Unitarian Sewing Society” (52.2, 150-171). Recently, her research interests have shifted to the reading habits of Florida women during the Progressive Era, as chronicled in the records of their literary clubs and mental improvement societies. She has presented one conference paper on this new research, and has several others in the works.

What was the last book you read? Elizabeth McHenry, Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002). As I work on this new project on the reading habits of Florida women during the Progressive Era, I’m struck by how little work has been done on Florida women in general, their literary societies in particular, and especially difficult to reconstruct are the reading practices of African-American women in this era of Jim Crow laws that hugely impacted the ability of women to associate, certainly in the state of Florida.

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015/Author: Kate Oestreich/Number of views (65)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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